AME Licence Type Rating Applications

Once you hold a NZ AMEL you are required to meet the CAA Rule requirements for the issue of type ratings.

Note:

  1. It is only at the initial recognition of a foreign AMEL for the issue of a NZ AMEL that CAA will recognise / endorse type ratings held on your foreign AMEL.
  2. Ratings are only issued for aircraft types on the NZ register.

The requirements for the issue of ratings are covered in Part 66 with further guidance in AC 66-1.

Below are the relevant sections from Part 66 and AC 66-1.

Note the requirements to:

1. Record and submit an experience log in an acceptable Practical Training Record (PTR)
  • Experience needs to be a broad cross-section of maintenance tasks at both Line and Base (Hangar). Maintenance Levels and should be across all relevant systems (appropriate ATA Chapters) for the category(s) applying for.
  • The range and depth of experience should be readily evident from a review of your PTR.
  • Refer to AC66-1 Appendix 5 for acceptable PTR requirements.
  • Examples of PTR

2. Complete an approved/acceptable course. CAA expectation is that type rating courses should be:

  • developed/packaged to an industry recognised standard, such as - ATA Specification 104 - Guidelines for Aircraft Maintenance Training - Level III (Line and Base Level Maintenance), or an equivalent standard;
  • cover all the relevant systems (ATA chapters) for the privilege of the category of licence;
  • cover the series of aircraft or powerplants that the rating provides privilege for;
  • cover a competency assessment element such as a technical oral.

The course must be:

  • conducted by the holder of an aviation training organisation certificate issued under Part 141 that authorises the conduct of such a course; or
  • conducted by the manufacturer of the applicable aircraft or component; or
  • approved by the competent authority of a foreign ICAO contracting state.

3. Complete Technical Oral Assessment / Examination

The Technical Oral should establish the engineer’s technical competence covering the full rating privilege being applied for. This should be conducted by the applicant’s Part 145 Maintenance Organisation (as part of their company authorisation procedures), or alternatively by the acceptable training provider using the CAA guidelines.

Rule Requirements

Part 66 Subpart C - Aircraft Maintenance Engineer Ratings

66.101 Applicability

This subpart prescribes the rules governing aircraft maintenance engineer group ratings and aircraft maintenance engineer type ratings.

66.103 Eligibility requirements

To be eligible for the grant of an aircraft maintenance engineer group or type rating a person shall:

  1. hold a current aircraft maintenance engineer licence; and
  2. have completed 6 months practical experience on the type or group of aircraft or components for which the rating is sought; and
  3. have successfully completed -
    • (i)   examinations acceptable to the Director; or
    • (ii)  a course of training relevant to the type of aircraft or components for which the rating is sought -

    - conducted by the holder of an aviation training organisation certificate issued under Part 141 which authorises the conduct of such a course; or

    - conducted by the manufacturer of the applicable aircraft or component; or

    - approved by the competent authority of a foreign Contracting state.

AC 66-1 Subpart C - Aircraft Maintenance Engineer Ratings

66.103 - Eligibility requirements

To be eligible for the grant of an aircraft maintenance engineer licence rating, the applicant must hold a current aircraft maintenance engineer licence and meet the practical experience and examination or course requirements detailed below.

66.103(2) - Practical experience

The rule specifies a minimum time of 6 months practical experience on the type or group of aircraft or aircraft components. This should be completed within the immediate three years before application to demonstrate familiarity and currency.

Documenting experience - Practical Training Record (PTR):

To demonstrate that six months practical experience has been completed for the issue of a rating, the experience should be documented in a suitable Practical Training Record (PTR).

The CAA has produced an acceptable PTR in conjunction with the ATTTO. This can be purchased from ATTTO - use this link. The ATTTO web site is www.attto.org.nz.

Engineers are not required to use the ATTTO / CAA PTR but the format of any acceptable PTR should list the specific tasks completed, being countersigned by a supervising LAME, along with details of the dates and the specific aircraft or component.

As a guide, a typical group rating PTR page has been included in Appendix 5.

This link has further PTR examples.

Only experience specific to the rating(s) sought should be included, or highlighted in some way in the PTR. The range and depth of the relevant experience should be readily evident from an assessment of the PTR.

Rating experience requirements

Practical experience should comprise a broad cross-section of maintenance tasks at both Line and Base (Hangar). Maintenance Levels and should be across all relevant systems (appropriate ATA Chapters) for the category(s) applying for.

Typically, this should include:

Completing all aspects of a number of line and base level routine inspections:

  • For transport category type rated aircraft this should include a minimum of three different C level type checks.

A broad cross section of the following representative tasks on the various aircraft systems:

  • trouble shooting
  • repair
  • adjustments and rigging
  • component and module changes
  • functional/operational checks
  • use of special tooling and test equipment.

Reference should be made to Appendix 4 that lists typical tasks by aircraft systems.

Group Ratings

As a guide, typical acceptable practical experience for group ratings should include the following practical experience.

Aeroplane and rotorcraft categories:

  • Minimum of three periodic inspections, including avionic systems
  • Minimum of two aircraft weighings, or weight and balance calculations for the first aeroplane and the first rotorcraft rating
  • Rectification of defects and component changes including avionic components
  • Compass compensation for the first rating
  • Functional testing and servicing of aircraft systems.

Powerplant category:

  • ·Minimum of three periodic inspections
  • Rectification of defects and component changes
  • Functional testing and servicing of powerplant systems, including propulsion engine ground running.

Note: Applicants for the Group 2 powerplant rating must hold the Group 1 powerplant rating.

Electrical category:

  • Periodic inspection and testing
  • Defect analysis and rectification, including component changes
  • Modification installation.

Instrument category:

  • Periodic inspection and testing
  • Defect analysis and rectification, including component changes
  • Modification installation
  • Compass compensation for the issue of the first rating.

Radio category:

  • Periodic inspection and testing
  • Defect analysis and rectification, including component changes
  • Modification installation.

Lighter-than-air category:

  • Periodic inspections
  • Fabric repairs and other rectification.

Note: If insufficient experience is shown for a group rating and this is due to the inability of the applicant to be exposed to more than one type within a group, the applicant may apply to have that type issued as a restricted type rating within a group. It is not intended for this to be usual practice, but the provision is included for cases of genuine need. If a genuine need cannot be substantiated then the application will be declined.

Type Ratings

For the issue and assessment of Type Ratings, practical experience and any specific OJT should be documented in an appropriate aircraft and/or powerplant specific type rating PTR that details/sets out the experience under the relevant systems (ATA Chapters).

For transport category aircraft, the PTR will normally be developed by the Part 145 Certificated Maintenance Organisation as part of their company authorisation procedures, and should clearly detail or set out an acceptable cross-section of specific tasks across the relevant systems that must be completed prior to the issue of a company authorisation.

Type rating PTRs may also be developed by a Part 141 aviation training organisation for their type rating courses.

66.103(3) - Examinations and courses

Type Ratings Courses

Type ratings require the completion of an approved or acceptable course. A course must be:

  • conducted by a Part 141 aviation training organisation, or a Part 145 maintenance organisation certificated (rule 145.11(a)(10)) with the appropriate E1 rating; or
  • conducted by the manufacturer of the applicable aircraft or component; or
  • approved by the competent authority of a foreign ICAO Contracting State.

Additionally, courses should:

  • be developed/packaged to an industry recognised  standard such as - ATA Specification 104 - Guidelines for Aircraft Maintenance Training - Level III (Line and Base Level Maintenance), or an equivalent standard;
  • cover all the relevant systems (ATA chapters) for the privilege of the category of licence;
  • cover the series of aircraft or powerplants that the rating provides privilege for;
  • cover a competency assessment element such as a technical oral.

Type rating courses should be completed within 2 years to ensure familiarity and currency on type. If more than 2 years has expired since course completion, the currency of type course may be satisfactory if the holder can show continuous or significant recent practical experience on the type since completion of the course.

In cases where approved courses are not available and the provisioning of an oral or written examination is within the capabilities of CAA or ASL, an examination may be conducted by ASL.

Technical Oral

The purpose of the technical oral is to establish the engineer’s technical competence relevant to the privileges of the type rating. That is, the engineer understands more than the just ‘nuts and bolts’ or theory of operation of the relevant powerplant or airframe, and can apply the knowledge from the course, to the maintenance requirements that they can be expected to perform, and certify for, in operation and maintenance.

This may be conducted by the applicant’s Part 145 Maintenance Organisation as part of their company authorisation procedures, or alternatively by a Part 141 Training School.

Note: As part of the requirements for a Part 145 company authorisation to be issued, the technical competence for the scope of the authorisation should be examined by an appropriate senior person within the company. Refer Rule 145.60(e)(1)

Where the course is conducted by a foreign course provider that is approved by a another ICAO contracting state, the technical oral may be conducted by the approved training provider using CAA guidelines for the content of the technical oral. These can be obtained by contacting CAA Personnel and Flight Training.